For the first time ever, Pop-up Globe presents ‛Canon Fodder’, a series of rehearsed play-readings designed to enhance your experience of our 2019 summer season.

This is your chance to encounter plays from the Renaissance canon, never performed in New Zealand before, that either influenced Shakespeare’s writing or were themselves influenced by it. A cast of professional actors will bring these plays to life, book in hand, each for one night only.

The Tamer Tamed, by John Fletcher
Details: Monday 25 February, 7:00pm
The perfect companion to The Taming of the Shrew, this hilarious 1612 sequel to Shakespeare’s play inverts the plot of the original, with the widowed Petruchio the recipient of marital abuse at the hands of his new wife, Maria, as she attempts to tame him into the perfect husband.

Book here.

The Spanish Tragedy, by Thomas Kyd
Details: Monday 4 March, 7:00pm
The Renaissance equivalent of Star Wars or Titanic, Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy was the most famous and popular play in Renaissance drama. Imagine a play with the blood-soaked plot of Titus Andronicus but performed by the characters of Hamlet. Written in the 1580s but performed all the way up to the closure of the playhouses in the 1640s, The Spanish Tragedy defined revenge tragedy as a genre and had an immense impact on Shakespeare’s writing and plotting.

Book here.

The Tragicall History of Hamlet Prince of Denmarke
Details: Monday 11 March, 7:00pm
This alternative version of Shakespeare’s play, first discovered in 1823 but first published in 1603, the year before the Hamlet we know today, has puzzled scholars and Shakespeare fans for two centuries. Is it an illegal, bootleg version of Shakespeare’s play, constructed from memory? Is it an earlier, incompetent draft of the play that then became Shakespeare’s masterpiece? Or is it a totally different play that Shakespeare based his one upon? This is your chance to hear it and decide!

Book here.

The Law Against Lovers, by William D’avenant
Details: Monday 25 March, 7:00pm
Of all the attempts to make Shakespeare’s plays better-suit the tastes of Restoration audiences after the English Civil War, none is more bizarre than this 1662 version of Measure for Measure which attempts to balance out the more distasteful aspects of the original by inserting Benedick and Beatrice from Much Ado About Nothing into it and turning Measure for Measure’s villainous Angelo into Benedick’s brother. See what happens when two polar-opposite Shakespeare plays and sets of characters vie for supremacy.

Book here.